Does your language alter your morals?

Or, does responding in a foreign language influence the choices you make?  Consider this article Amrit found about the role language plays in determining the best action when thinking through the trolley car dilemma.

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The History Unit

On Tuesday, December 5th, as an introduction to our history unit, you are going to be asked to examine several historical artifacts.  You will only get a few minutes with each artifact, so use your time wisely.  Your job is to determine what can be known from the artifacts.  You must read and examine ten artifacts and then explain in writing what can be inferred from an analysis based on your examination of at least three artifacts.  Today’s guiding question is:

What challenges does a historian face when analyzing a written text?

As you take notes, you should consider:

Read one article:  Where is it from?  What date?  What is its purpose?  What can we infer about its authors?  What can we infer about the readers?  What can be inferred about the society at the time?

Read one advertisement: Where is it from?  What date?  What is its purpose?  What can we infer about its authors?  What can we infer about the readers?  What can be inferred about the society at the time?

These are the years of the artifacts:

  1. 1812
  2. 1816
  3. 1822
  4. 1823
  5. 1824
  6. 1841
  7. 1845
  8. 1856
  9. 1860
  10. 1868
  11. 1879
  12. 1918

For class tomorrow, arrive with your brief paragraph explaining what inferences you drew from your examination. (consider at least 3 artifacts in your analysis)

First year ToK

Did you miss the Last Session –  What is Time?  If so, here’s what to do.  It should take you about 90 minutes.  That’s what we spent in class.

  1.  Freewrite – What is time? (and how is time known?)
    1. go beyond the superficial into the literal
    2. include:  “Is time real? Is it merely imagined?”
  2.  What are some expressions with time? Write ten.
    1. Can you group them?  Ask a friend (who made the session) for help.  How is time different in this grouping.
  • Time personified
  • Time as segment
  • Time as point
  • Time as fluid (metaphor)
  • Moving Observer
  • Independent Time
  • [5 min] Discuss the differences: How is time different if we know it this way?

Consider the ToK Diagram: How is time known?

  • Write your thoughts: include the role of imagination, reason, language, sensation, memory and experience
  • When is time slower for you?
  • Consider the role of logic:  When you are rewinding video – it’s logical, right?  Is time that flows backward illogical?  Consider and justify in writing

I wonder how Einstein thought of time

Read sample of Alan Lightman’s Einstein’s Dreams

Lightman is a physicist and author.  Read the prologue while listening to Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata 

Then read…

  • 3 May 1905 – Cause and Effect erratic – 29
  • 29 May 1905 – Everything is in motion (106pdf)– 69
  • Time flows – page 10
  • 20 May 1905 – No memory (93pdf)
  • 22 May 1905 – Time flows fitfully (100pdf)– 65

For each, write a response: What did you notice about that world? How was time different?   How did the author craft the world?  What did he write about? Include?  Illuminate?  How did time influence people in that story?

Lastly, write your own (20 min)… you may draw, create a poem…

Assume I will publish your work on the blog.

These are due by December 1st.

 

 

Today, we tried to reason

How’d you do on this test?

 

Reasoning Test                                                                                  100% = A                   < 100% = F

This test consists of four reasoning tasks. You should do them in order, reading the instructions carefully, not proceeding to the next task until you have completed the one before it.

 

Task 1: Even Vowels

E T 4 7
       

Imagine that you are employed in quality control by a card manufacturer. They are producing a series of cards for an experimental psychologist, according to the following rule: if a card has a vowel on one side, then it has an even number on the other side.

There are four of these cards at left. You know for certain that each card has a letter on one side and a number on the other. In light of this knowledge, check the box(es) under the card or cards you definitely need to turn over, and only that or those cards, in order to determine whether the rule is broken in the case of any of these four cards.

 

 

            square

 circle        Yellow

     Red

       

Task 2: Colored Circles and Squares

Imagine that you have been employed by a board games manufacturer to ensure that the cards in one of their games have been correctly produced.  The rule governing the production of the cards states that if a card has a circle on one side, then it has the color yellow on the other.

There are four such cards at right. You know for certain that each card has a shape on one side and a color on the other. In light of this knowledge, tick the box(es) under the card or cards you definitely need to turn over, and only that or those cards, in order to determine whether the rule is broken in the case of any of these four cards.

 

Task 3: Sly Beer Drinking

You are the owner of a bar and you are very concerned that underage-drinking laws should be correctly enforced. Your bar is situated in a university town, and you suspect that some of your clientele might be students not yet old enough to drink legally. At present, the law states that if a person drinks an alcoholic drink (e.g., beer), then they must be more than 21 years old.

  Drank beer  Drank cola 23 years old 19 years old
 

 

     

The cards below have information about the ages and drinking habits of four of the customers at your bar. Each card represents one person. One side of a card details the age of the person. The other side of the card indicates what they have been drinking.

In light of this knowledge, check the box(es) under the card or cards you definitely need to turn over, and only that or those cards, in order to determine whether the rule is broken in the case of any of these four drinkers.

 

Task 4: Surfing at Work

Imagine that you are the owner of a small company employing some twenty people. You have noticed that your employees seem to be spending a lot of time during work hours surfing the Web for personal pleasure. You consider this practice to be a perk rather than a right, so you have introduced a rule that states that if an employee spends more than two hours a day during work time on the Web, then they must have made at least $5K for the company in the last month.

   Spent 1 hour on  the Web Spent 3 hours

on the Web

  Made $3K
last month
  Made $7K
last month
       

The cards below have information about the Web-surfing habits of four of your employees. Each card represents one employee. One side of the card details how much time the employee has spent on the Web during the last working day. The other side details how much money they have made for the company in the last month.

In light of this knowledge, tick the box(es) under the card or cards that you definitely need to turn over, and only that or those cards, in order to determine whether the rule is broken in the case of any of these four employees.       – Taken from Do You Think What You Think You Think? By Baggini and Stangroom

Emotional reading

for Tuesday, 11/14. Textbooks are at the back of the room in the upper cabinet.  Get a book and…

  1. Read Part 2 section 9 (pages 154-170) be aware of the material and ideas. Write down what is necessary.  Don’t be neurotic about it.
  2. Read and take notes on Emotional Fallacies from 171-173 (This is important.  Take detailed notes).
  3. Then, find a current political argument presented in either a speech, press release, or article.  Print a portion of the source with the argument.  Imbed it into your analysis where you identify the emotional appeal and what makes it misleading.
  4. When finished, read and take notes on reasoned fallacies from 126-129 (This is important.  Take detailed notes).